What happens when you work hard to stay in shape, maintain your weight, and be healthy while your spouse refuses to exercise? You may suffer as well.

Even though your spouse may be on the verge of diabetes, obesity, or high blood pressure, he or she may not see the importance of exercise. You beg, you nag, and you give gentle reminders but nothing seems to work. This can be a frustrating situation that strains a relationship. You want your loved one to be healthy but don’t know what to say or what to do to make him or her feel the same about exercise as you do.

You can’t force your spouse to exercise, but here are a few ideas provided by South Edmonton Fit Body Boot Camp, to create an atmosphere conducive to make exercise a group activity.

Figure Out Why

It’s hard to change someone’s behavior if you don’t know the reasons behind their actions. All you may see is laziness, excuses, and other priorities. But don’t be so quick to judge. Your spouse has reasons for not exercising, whether they’re valid or not. It’s important to uncover why your spouse prefers to be on the couch rather than at the gym.

Maybe your husband or wife doesn’t like to be told what to do. Give your love the freedom to make the choice and you may be delightfully surprised. (Note to self: lay low and give your spouse space.)

Many people just don’t feel like they have time for exercise, don’t want to miss out on family time, or hate the gym. When you know the reasons, you can offer your support, give suggestions, and work together to make it happen.

Set an Example

You can talk all you want about exercise, but until your spouse sees the positive difference it makes in your daily life, skepticism will remain. Show rather than tell. Don’t let your significant other’s poor attitude influence your commitment to exercise. Stick with it and reach your goals.

When your spouse watches as you lose weight, get fit, relieve stress, and lower your blood pressure, you won’t be working out alone for long.

Focus on Small Steps

For someone out of shape and in poor health, exercise can seem overwhelming. It’s easy to get stuck in a rut and remain comfortable with your lifestyle. It can take courage to make changes.

The fitness trainers at South Edmonton gym center believe that it’s important to celebrate the small steps. Don’t expect your spouse to run a mile or keep up with you from day one. But when he or she joins in a basketball game with the kids or takes a walk with you after dinner, make a big deal out of it. Celebrate the small stuff and the big stuff will come.

Get Regular Check-Ups

It’s often in one ear and out the other when a spouse urges a partner to exercise for good health. You can give statistics, medical facts, and even personal success stories, but words may not seem to make any difference. A doctor’s advice, on the other hand, usually holds more weight.

Hearing the words, “Your high blood pressure puts you at risk for early death. Your spouse and kids need you around,” may kick your hubby or wife into gear.

What Not to Do

It’s easy to let your frustration and worries come out in hurtful words. Belittling or criticizing your spouse for being overweight or not wanting to exercise, especially in front of others, is never the right thing to do.

When your spouse finally agrees to exercise with you, don’t be a “know it all.” Avoid pointing out incorrect form or technique. Let your trainer lend your spouse a hand.

And remember that guilt and manipulation tactics never motivate someone to exercise. Pestering and nagging will only raise the walls farther. A commitment to exercise has to come from within. South Edmonton bootcamp says the best thing you can do is create an atmosphere that’s conducive to a healthy lifestyle and wait.

Big Mistake. Don’t be tempted to buy your spouse an exercise-related gift like hand weights or a gym membership. Your spouse may take these the wrong way and feel unloved or not accepted.